• Over this past weekend, I had the privilege of attending a field trip for my honors “Health Inequalities” political science course with Professor Dean Robinson to the UMass Center at Springfield, a satellite campus to UMass Amherst offering programs in nursing, education, business and more. Like most college students, waking up at 8 a.m. on a Saturday to go on a field trip really wasn’t my cup of tea. While I might’ve woken up that morning desiring nothing else but a few more hours of sleep, the field trip proved itself as a valuable learning experience. Our class had... Read More
  • Attendance: The Massachusetts Undergraduate Research Conference (Mass URC) is a day set aside for students and professors from 28 different universities across the Commonwealth to share and present their original research and learn from other students. So, basically, one of the largest networking opportunities UMass offers. There will be students from every field of study presenting their research. No, seriously: marketing, journalism, communication, biochemistry, etc. Every major, hundreds of students, all presenting their research and it’s free to attend. Networking:... Read More
  • The death of Nipsey Hussle has hit a lot of people I know really hard. The mourning is in part due to what an amazing person he was and what he was doing for his community. However, it also has to do with what his death represents to a lot of people: the dangers that black and brown men face in our country, specifically if they are rappers or community activists. The stories of what he was doing in his community have blown my mind. Often we talk about what we would like to see people do or change in their communities, and rarely do we acknowledge the people doing it.... Read More
  • Ryan’s Question: How does it feel to be inducted into Phi Kappa Phi? Amberly’s Answer: It feels kind of weird—but a neat kind of weird—to be perfectly honest. (For those who don’t know what Phi Kappa Phi is, it’s an honor society that you can find out more about here. I was inducted into the society last Sunday, March 31.) I’m not used to a big deal being made of my academic achievements. I do my assignments, I try my best on them, I turn them in, and then I get a grade. Sometimes, a couple of months after the semester is over, I get an email from UMass telling me I... Read More
  • Ryan’s Question: Would you say that you ever feel inspired to do random things that you previously had no interest in? If so, has this occurred more once you attended college? Amberly’s Answer: Well, you know me, Ryan. I am not typically inspired to do random things. I am a thoughtful, cautious person. My brain tends to map out all of the possible effects of my decision, even as I’ve just made it. It maps out all of the possible ways it can go wrong, all of the possible ways it can go right. If I’ve chosen to do something “randomly,” it’s likely I quietly did some... Read More
  • This past week I wrote an article for the Daily Collegian covering an event on the upcoming documentary, Ashes to Ashes, which shows Dr. Shirley Whitaker’s effort to honor and mourn the nearly 4,000 reported African American people who were lynched between 1866 to 1950. This event was both really intense and beautiful. In Springfield in 2017, Dr. Whitaker organized a funeral service for the people killed, and part of the documentary showed that experience, with some individuals' names being called and remembered (this was big for Dr. Whitaker; she told me she wanted to... Read More
  • In my International Journalism class this past week, we had to choose a story that caught our attention and bring it into class. One angle my professor said we could take was looking for stories that we thought were not getting enough attention. I took this angle, and it brought me to the Sudan protests. As someone who reads the news religiously every morning, it is surprising that I am still shocked that major news from certain parts of the world is so systematically excluded from our media. The protests in Sudan, continuing now as they have been for weeks, are an... Read More
  • Ryan's Question: What do you think the role of technology plays on a college campus? Amberly's Answer: To be frank, I think it would be easier to ask what part of campus and college at large isn't affected by technology. Everywhere you look, you will see a laptop or a phone out, ready to connect with the internet and the world. The lobbies (at least in the Honors College) have a TV screen, ready to play the Superbowl or the latest episode of American Horror Story. In classrooms, we have an increasing number of projectors and smart screens. We use sites like Moodle and... Read More
  • Mass General Law Chapter 272 Section 80D states the following:   “No person shall sell, offer for sale, barter, or give away as premiums living baby chickens, ducklings, or other fowl under two months of age; violation of which will result in a fine of not more than one hundred dollars.”  Notwithstanding the enumerations of the first statement, such a sale, barter, or other exchange is permitted if 1) the person(s) acquiring the birds is a breeder buying for commercial use; and 2) that the birds are sold past the first day of May in quantities of two dozen or more; or 3... Read More
  • This past weekend asylum seekers from Central and South America faced tear gas from American authorities as they tried to cross the U.S.-Mexican border. It has been hard for me to figure out what’s really happening because so much focus has been on Trump’s rhetoric instead of the people themselves. Here are some points that have helped me get a grasp on the situation (taken from the articles at the bottom): The U.S. cannot get rid of its legal obligation to accept asylum seekers, but the process can be delayed/prolonged. Migrants are facing tear gas, unsanitary... Read More

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